First AHA/ASA Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Guidelines


ASA logoOn May 4th in their publication Stroke,  the The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) for the first time issued guidelines on stroke rehabilitation and recovery.  This scientific statement on rehabilitation is the 8th set of stroke guidelines from the American Stroke Association, and these guidelines focusing on recovery are the last of the association’s recommendations for the continuum of care for stroke patients and their families.

Grade the Guidelines

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How do you think the AHA/ASA did with their guidelines for stroke recovery and rehabilitation?  Do you think they hit the mark or fell short for stroke survivors and caregivers?

Give the guidelines a grade here:

 

I believe the guidelines scored a solid B (maybe minus).  Here’s my bottom line on the guidelines, and why I believe they fell short.

I just posted it to know-stroke.org. Check it out!

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NEVER “too young” to think about Stroke



Another young bright mind, Isaac Webber, is dismissed initially as being “too young” to have a stroke


Here’s why we all might want to do a better job recognizing the stroke warning signs….at any age!

Just posted this article on my Know Stroke site-Please Read and SHARE!

THANK YOU !!

Stroke Body Language


Stroke

Do you know the Body Language?

Don’t be shy-Find out here

knowstrokebodylanguageBright Minds Know Stroke
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PFO (Patent Foramen Ovale) Educational Videos


PFO Closure Tipping Point

A Collection of Videos on PFO (Patent Foramen Ovale) Detection, PFO Closure Procedures, and  current PFO Research and Education Initiatives

David Dansereau, Know-Stroke.org

See All PFO Videos

Use Coumadin Blister Packs? Take note of recent recall


Coumadin Recall / Bristol Myers

1 mg Tablet Blister Packs only

Recall Notice :  Posted  from FDA / MedWatch

AUDIENCE: Hematology, Cardiology, Risk Manager

RECALL INFO: Bristol-Myers Squibb determined that some of the tablets, over time, may not meet specification for isopropanol. Isopropanol is used to maintain the active ingredient, Coumadin, in the crystalline state, and could affect the therapeutic levels of the active ingredient. A decrease of active ingredient may increase the risk of clots which could lead to heart attack or stroke, and if there is too much active ingredient, there is an increased risk of bleeding.

The following lot numbers are included in this recall: Physician Sample Blister Packs: Lot# 9A48931A, 9A48931B, 9A48931C, expiration January 2012; HUD Blister Pack: Lot# 8F34006B, 8K44272A, 8K46168A, 9F44437A and 9K58012B with expiry dates between June 2011 and November 2012.

BACKGROUND: The recall only involves Coumadin 1 mg tablet blister-packs distributed in the U.S. This recall does not involve Coumadin 1 mg supplied in bottles or any other strengths and dosage forms of the product. Patients who may have product from the subject lots should contact their physicians to ensure that their anticoagulation therapy is not interrupted.

RECOMMENDATION: See the company Press Release for additional contact information. Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

To Read the MedWatch safety alert, including a link to the company press release click here