Stroke and Young Adult (SAYA) Program at Tufts Medical Center


Help needed to learn more about stroke and young adults.


Can you share your story?

post by David Dansereau,MSPT Know-Stroke.org

David Dansereau at Know-Stroke.org

A stroke is devastating at any age.  When you are forced to deal with a stroke at a young age, there are many additional challenges during your recovery.  From getting back your independence, restoring your identity and returning to life after this life changing event, there are many obstacles to overcome. Typical current models for treating and guiding individuals after their strokes often do not account for long-term survival and the unique recovery needs encountered by young adults that suffer a stroke.

With the help of experts in specialties across Tufts Medical Center, Vascular Neurologist Lester Y. Leung, MD hopes to make a difference in young stroke survivors lives and improve the model of care for young survivors.  Dr. Leung has built a comprehensive, longitudinal care program for Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) to help young adult and pediatric stroke survivors navigate their lives after stroke.

The Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) Program is built to help identify causes of your stroke, optimize prevention of future strokes, estimate your risk for recurrent stroke and late complications of stroke, and provide counseling on stroke survivorship.  Dr. Leung currently needs your help and wants to learn about your experience with stroke.

Here is a brief intro to the SAYA interview study:


Are you a stroke survivor? Did your stroke or TIA (transient ischemic attack) occur between ages 18 and 55? Dr. Lester Leung and his team at Tufts Medical Center are interviewing young and early middle age adults about their experiences with their strokes to better understand how people develop symptoms in these age ranges, how they decide to seek medical care, and how they make decisions about their health after their strokes. If you are interested in participating, please contact Dr. Leung at lleung@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. Interviews usually take about 30-45 minutes and can be done in person or over the telephone. The team is giving participants a $15 Amazon gift card as a sign of gratitude for participation in the study.

 

What do you need as a stroke survivor outside the clinic?


Outside the clinic and hospital, the SAYA Program at Tufts would like to help you connect with other stroke survivors and their families to get out of the house, share experiences, or just have some fun! They’re interested in hearing your ideas and preferences for the social/educational/support aspect of the Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) Program at Tufts Medical Center. This program is the first and only one of its kind, and we’d like to tailor it to your interests. Would you like the events to focus on being fun, or would you like an educational or support piece built in as well? What sort of things would you like to do? Let them know here.

They’ve invited you to fill out the form SAYA Social Survey. To fill it out, visit their survey here.


Resources:

Learn more about Dr. Leung

Overview of SAYA Program at Tufts

bodyandbalanceorsickandtired

 

Advertisements

King Wilder, 57, never knew he had a hole in his heart until he had a stroke


 Listen to this 911 call and share Mr. Wilder’s  chilling experience of what it feels like to be having a stroke and not be able to communicate.  It was later determined that the cause of his stroke was probably caused from a PFO (patent foramen ovale), or hole in his heart.

 

As shared by The Desert Sun

 

stroke911knowstrokeorg

Canadian Stroke Survivors Weigh In


Stroke Survivors Bring Great Benefit to Shaping Research

Surviving a stroke is a really confusing experience (to say the least), and unless you have lived through it you can’t really understand the complexity of the situation you are faced with.  When I read about great work that is being done to give stroke survivors a better voice weighing in about what it was like and what would have helped them seek treatment faster I like to share it.   This is great work, and I think we need to do more of it!  As mentioned in this article,  better help certainly begins with better awareness.  The survivors also mentioned more access to care and overcoming those barriers to getting affordable stroke rehab is also needed.

bodyandbalanceorsickandtired

Many survivors often say they would have acted differently if they had more information on recognizing and dealing with stroke symptoms and if they knew of all the rehab options and technologies that were open to them.  Read the article here in the University of Calgary’s Utoday

Catechins in green tea reduce stroke risk


Nutrition and Stroke Prevention


greenteabenefitsstroke

Making small but positive lifestyle changes such as adding green tea to your daily diet can lower the risk of stroke by as much as 30 percent.  This is not new research but small changes like this often go ignored and they can have a significant impact on your health.  Researchers at the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center in Japan conducted and published the results of this important study in Stroke, the Journal of the American Heart Association several years ago that explains how drinking green tea on a regular basis is associated with a dramatically reduced risk of stroke.  The team also investigated the effect of drinking coffee and found the beverage can yield similar results to those found with green tea consumption. Many health-minded people avoid coffee due to the highly processed nature of the bean and increased levels of homocysteine, blood pressure and blood lipids which may offset the possible health benefits when comparing green tea directly with coffee.  I also talk about coffee and my take on how it relates to a Body in Balance in my book.

How does green tea reduce stroke risk?

Researchers concluded that green tea provides a healthy dose of catechins that are potent antioxidants and exert anti-inflammatory properties that help lower stroke risk.  The most active and abundant catechin in green tea is known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Cateching also play a powerful role in reducing certain cancer risks and keeping joints healthy.  In contrast to green tea, coffee contains chlorogenic acid that helps modulate blood sugar levels to improve vascular health.  Green coffee bean extract in supplement form can supply chlorogenic acid without the side effects experienced with coffee consumption.

Smart Move:

greenteaLower your stroke risk by drinking up to four cups of fresh brewed, organic green tea every day!  I get my organic teas online through Puritan’s Pride and usually stock up when they run 2 for one specials and offer free shipping.

 

Here’s how to brew the perfect cup of green tea:


The perfect cup of green tea is flavorful, not too bitter, weak or watery – in fact, I have a hot cup beside me now that I make this way:

  1. Use 2 grams (roughly one teaspoon) of loose green tea leaves for every 6 ounces of water. Ideally you should use organic, non-irradiated tea leaves. Whether you use tap, filtered, or spring water is up to you – however, fresh cold water that has not been previously boiled is the best option (avoid fluoridated tap water, paying special attention not to re-boil fluoridated tap water as the chemical will concentrate).
  2. To make the tea, place the water in a tea kettle and heat it to 160°-180°F. Alternatively, you could heat the water to just short of boiling. Place the loose leaves in a teapot or cup (you may want to add a small amount of room temperature water − enough to dampen the tea leaves or bag before adding the water). Pour the water over the tea leaves.
  3. Next, place the lid on the teapot. If using a cup, cover it with a lid or a small saucer. Depending on the particular variety of green tea, it should be allowed to steep for 1-3 minutes. Small leaves generally infuse more quickly than large leaves.
  4. Enjoy!

freecancerdocumentary

References:


American Heart/Stroke Association

Puritans Pride Organic Green Tea

Truth About Cancer Documentary

Learn more about how green tea can reduce cancer risk

Learn more about how green tea can help keep joints healthy

Body in Balance Book


 

Shower in Savings! 15% Off Any 2 or more Puritan’s Pride Brand Items + Free Shipping. See Details. Code:  Ends 5/1 11:59 PM PST.


 Learn more about green tea in my bookthickpaperbackfronttrans200x319Best Seller in Preventive Medicine!

Supplements: Safe or a Sham?


PBS Frontline Film:

Supplements and Safety

With many stroke survivors now taking or considering taking a supplement to gain an edge in their recovery, I thought I’d repost this on my Stroke blog from my nutrition website with my takeaways after watching the Frontline special earlier this week on supplement safety.


According to a new film by  PBS’s Frontline which aired January 19th, “There is no effective system to detect potential harm from supplements”.  The film also points the finger at the failed US Medwatch system at the FDA and their weak ability to keep up with all the potentially dangerous nutritional supplements  that are hitting the market without adequate regulation.


supplementsafety

Read my full article with the link to the PBS Film: Supplements and Safety

bodyandbalanceorsickandtired

Higher exhaled carbon monoxide levels linked to increased stroke risk


According to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015 and reported by American Heart Association News, high levels of exhaled carbon monoxide was associated with a greater risk of future stroke and transient ischemic attack among seemingly healthy adults.

feedyourbrainCarbon monoxide is produced naturally by the human body as a signaling molecule. Because of carbon monoxide’s role in the body, abnormalities in its metabolism have been linked to a variety of diseases, including neurodegenerations, high blood pressure, heart failure, and inflammation.

Past studies have linked high exhaled CO levels to an elevated heart disease risk. In this study, researchers from the Framingham Heart Study analyzed the association between exhaled CO and stroke risk in 3,313 adults who were free of stroke at the study’s start.

CO exhalation levels were measured in all participants and brain imaging scans were available in 1,982 participants. They found that the participants were more likely to have lower total brain volumes, higher white matter volumes and a greater prevalence of silent stroke if they were in the highest third of CO levels, compared to those in the lowest third.

When they followed the patients for an average of almost 13 years, they found:


 

  • Participants in the middle third of exhaled CO in the study population had a 67 percent increased stroke and TIA incidence compared to those in the lowest third.
  • Participants with the highest third of CO exhalation had a 97 percent increased stroke and TIA incidence, compared to those in the third with the lowest CO exhalation levels.

Researchers said more research is needed to explore why this association between CO exhalation levels and stroke exists.

Source

wmu101250250banner

 

Stroke Recovery Goal Setting Action Guide


In my last post I mentioned my book Body in Balance is a great place to find help with how to create an action plan for achieving your own goals.  I forgot to mention I also have a great free stroke recovery goals setting action guide you can access right away with this instant download.  It is part of my home stroke recovery goal setting webinar.  You can still register for the free webinar rebroadcast, download this action guide and get started building smart goals of your own!


largeregisternowlarge

Take Action!


 
thickpaperbackfronttrans200x319Buy Now on Amazon!