Here’s the nutrition facts on artificial sweeteners and stroke risk


Most processed foods today have added sugars.  With up to 70% of all processed and packaged foods on the market today being infused with more sugar, it is indeed difficult to avoid the white stuff. So what about the substitutes, the low to no cal sweeteners that promise you they are better for your health.  Are they any better?  What about if you’ve already had a stroke or have heart disease?  It makes sense why drinking all that sugar might increase stroke and heart disease risk, with the extra inflammation and triglycerides but is switching to these non caloric sweetners a better choice?

A study on diet soda

No problem,” I’ve switched to diet soda”.  I hear this all the time when I speak with a client that has “made the switch”. But by choosing diet soda, can we get the sweet taste we crave, without the downsides? Unfortunately, routine consumption of diet soft drinks is associated with increases in the same risks that many seek to avoid by using artificial sweeteners.  Watch this nutritionfacts.org video below!

The video reviews the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with regular soda, and  the cardiovascular risks associated with diet soda.  Key finding: the belief that “making the switch”  to diet soda will reduce long-term health risks ” is not well supported by scientific evidence, and instead…may contribute to the very health risks people were seeking to avoid” in the first place.

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Stroke and Young Adult (SAYA) Program at Tufts Medical Center


Help needed to learn more about stroke and young adults.


Can you share your story?

post by David Dansereau,MSPT Know-Stroke.org

David Dansereau at Know-Stroke.org

A stroke is devastating at any age.  When you are forced to deal with a stroke at a young age, there are many additional challenges during your recovery.  From getting back your independence, restoring your identity and returning to life after this life changing event, there are many obstacles to overcome. Typical current models for treating and guiding individuals after their strokes often do not account for long-term survival and the unique recovery needs encountered by young adults that suffer a stroke.

With the help of experts in specialties across Tufts Medical Center, Vascular Neurologist Lester Y. Leung, MD hopes to make a difference in young stroke survivors lives and improve the model of care for young survivors.  Dr. Leung has built a comprehensive, longitudinal care program for Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) to help young adult and pediatric stroke survivors navigate their lives after stroke.

The Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) Program is built to help identify causes of your stroke, optimize prevention of future strokes, estimate your risk for recurrent stroke and late complications of stroke, and provide counseling on stroke survivorship.  Dr. Leung currently needs your help and wants to learn about your experience with stroke.

Here is a brief intro to the SAYA interview study:


Are you a stroke survivor? Did your stroke or TIA (transient ischemic attack) occur between ages 18 and 55? Dr. Lester Leung and his team at Tufts Medical Center are interviewing young and early middle age adults about their experiences with their strokes to better understand how people develop symptoms in these age ranges, how they decide to seek medical care, and how they make decisions about their health after their strokes. If you are interested in participating, please contact Dr. Leung at lleung@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. Interviews usually take about 30-45 minutes and can be done in person or over the telephone. The team is giving participants a $15 Amazon gift card as a sign of gratitude for participation in the study.

 

What do you need as a stroke survivor outside the clinic?


Outside the clinic and hospital, the SAYA Program at Tufts would like to help you connect with other stroke survivors and their families to get out of the house, share experiences, or just have some fun! They’re interested in hearing your ideas and preferences for the social/educational/support aspect of the Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) Program at Tufts Medical Center. This program is the first and only one of its kind, and we’d like to tailor it to your interests. Would you like the events to focus on being fun, or would you like an educational or support piece built in as well? What sort of things would you like to do? Let them know here.

They’ve invited you to fill out the form SAYA Social Survey. To fill it out, visit their survey here.


Resources:

Learn more about Dr. Leung

Overview of SAYA Program at Tufts

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New American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Guidelines on PFO Closure in Cryptogenic Stroke are Discouraging


David Dansereau
David Dansereau (Know-Stroke.org)

AAN Ruling Again on P values NOT Patient Values

[In my opinion this is very discouraging news and more evidence to show there is still a great divide in how neurologists and cardiologists treat cryptogenic stroke with known PFO.]

PFO Closure Tipping Point

Despite the hard work of PFO patients (like myself) to make a difference by providing testimony and  their real life perspectives to the FDA recently, it looks like the AAN is unmoved and keeping with their same position on how to best mangage and educate patients that have had a cryptogenic stroke with confirmed  PFO.

 

Read the post of this news from TCTMD

 

Did you grab this FREE About Herbs App?


A Guide to Botanicals,Supplements, Complementary Therapies and More

If you are on our Know-Stroke.org Member News List you already received this free About Herbs app link.  I wanted to also share this information with my stroke community here so you don’t miss this resource.  I’ve learned from our Smart Moves Webinars that many stroke survivors often have  questions about supplements and herbs and I found this app to be a helpful free tool to provide some of those answers.  Learn more here….

Learn about this Free App in our latest Know-Stroke.org News Post

First AHA/ASA Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation Guidelines


ASA logoOn May 4th in their publication Stroke,  the The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) for the first time issued guidelines on stroke rehabilitation and recovery.  This scientific statement on rehabilitation is the 8th set of stroke guidelines from the American Stroke Association, and these guidelines focusing on recovery are the last of the association’s recommendations for the continuum of care for stroke patients and their families.

Grade the Guidelines

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How do you think the AHA/ASA did with their guidelines for stroke recovery and rehabilitation?  Do you think they hit the mark or fell short for stroke survivors and caregivers?

Give the guidelines a grade here:

 

I believe the guidelines scored a solid B (maybe minus).  Here’s my bottom line on the guidelines, and why I believe they fell short.

I just posted it to know-stroke.org. Check it out!

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King Wilder, 57, never knew he had a hole in his heart until he had a stroke


 Listen to this 911 call and share Mr. Wilder’s  chilling experience of what it feels like to be having a stroke and not be able to communicate.  It was later determined that the cause of his stroke was probably caused from a PFO (patent foramen ovale), or hole in his heart.

 

As shared by The Desert Sun

 

stroke911knowstrokeorg

Canadian Stroke Survivors Weigh In


Stroke Survivors Bring Great Benefit to Shaping Research

Surviving a stroke is a really confusing experience (to say the least), and unless you have lived through it you can’t really understand the complexity of the situation you are faced with.  When I read about great work that is being done to give stroke survivors a better voice weighing in about what it was like and what would have helped them seek treatment faster I like to share it.   This is great work, and I think we need to do more of it!  As mentioned in this article,  better help certainly begins with better awareness.  The survivors also mentioned more access to care and overcoming those barriers to getting affordable stroke rehab is also needed.

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Many survivors often say they would have acted differently if they had more information on recognizing and dealing with stroke symptoms and if they knew of all the rehab options and technologies that were open to them.  Read the article here in the University of Calgary’s Utoday