Stroke and Young Adult (SAYA) Program at Tufts Medical Center


Help needed to learn more about stroke and young adults.


Can you share your story?

post by David Dansereau,MSPT Know-Stroke.org

David Dansereau at Know-Stroke.org

A stroke is devastating at any age.  When you are forced to deal with a stroke at a young age, there are many additional challenges during your recovery.  From getting back your independence, restoring your identity and returning to life after this life changing event, there are many obstacles to overcome. Typical current models for treating and guiding individuals after their strokes often do not account for long-term survival and the unique recovery needs encountered by young adults that suffer a stroke.

With the help of experts in specialties across Tufts Medical Center, Vascular Neurologist Lester Y. Leung, MD hopes to make a difference in young stroke survivors lives and improve the model of care for young survivors.  Dr. Leung has built a comprehensive, longitudinal care program for Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) to help young adult and pediatric stroke survivors navigate their lives after stroke.

The Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) Program is built to help identify causes of your stroke, optimize prevention of future strokes, estimate your risk for recurrent stroke and late complications of stroke, and provide counseling on stroke survivorship.  Dr. Leung currently needs your help and wants to learn about your experience with stroke.

Here is a brief intro to the SAYA interview study:


Are you a stroke survivor? Did your stroke or TIA (transient ischemic attack) occur between ages 18 and 55? Dr. Lester Leung and his team at Tufts Medical Center are interviewing young and early middle age adults about their experiences with their strokes to better understand how people develop symptoms in these age ranges, how they decide to seek medical care, and how they make decisions about their health after their strokes. If you are interested in participating, please contact Dr. Leung at lleung@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. Interviews usually take about 30-45 minutes and can be done in person or over the telephone. The team is giving participants a $15 Amazon gift card as a sign of gratitude for participation in the study.

 

What do you need as a stroke survivor outside the clinic?


Outside the clinic and hospital, the SAYA Program at Tufts would like to help you connect with other stroke survivors and their families to get out of the house, share experiences, or just have some fun! They’re interested in hearing your ideas and preferences for the social/educational/support aspect of the Stroke and Young Adults (SAYA) Program at Tufts Medical Center. This program is the first and only one of its kind, and we’d like to tailor it to your interests. Would you like the events to focus on being fun, or would you like an educational or support piece built in as well? What sort of things would you like to do? Let them know here.

They’ve invited you to fill out the form SAYA Social Survey. To fill it out, visit their survey here.


Resources:

Learn more about Dr. Leung

Overview of SAYA Program at Tufts

bodyandbalanceorsickandtired

 

Advertisements

Did you grab this FREE About Herbs App?


A Guide to Botanicals,Supplements, Complementary Therapies and More

If you are on our Know-Stroke.org Member News List you already received this free About Herbs app link.  I wanted to also share this information with my stroke community here so you don’t miss this resource.  I’ve learned from our Smart Moves Webinars that many stroke survivors often have  questions about supplements and herbs and I found this app to be a helpful free tool to provide some of those answers.  Learn more here….

Learn about this Free App in our latest Know-Stroke.org News Post

Get Real


 

After a Stroke

Thank you to Nancy Coulter-Parker, Editor for Stroke Smart Magazine for a great interview and article in the current 2016 edition.  Nancy featured some of my top tips for goal setting after a stroke in their “Ask the Expert” column.

Get Real is a great headline, especially for the topic of goal setting.  Here are my top five tips from the article for getting real(istic) with your goals:

  1. Find a Starting Point
  2. Set a Road Map
  3. Know Who is on Your Team
  4. The Power of ‘Why”
  5. Be Accountable

To learn more about each of these tips, please read the article on StrokeSmart

These tips were from my book, Body in Balance, as well as from my Stroke Recovery Goal Setting Webinar. Those resources are listed below.

Resources:

Body in Balance Book

How to Set Smart Goals after a Stroke Webinar

Stroke Smart

By the way, here was my Goal in the picture below:

Read the article to learned how I planned for it….

bostonfinishlinedansereau

EXACTLY what you should know about Weight Management


Your HEALTH is so Much More

than just Pounds on the SCALE


Learn about the Ten “Extra” Benefits to losing weight now in this quick video and finally begin to commit to Take Charge of Your Health this YEAR!  Enroll in our online weight management course (WMU-101) to find out how to lose unwanted bodyfat now and begin managing your overall health forever.

Register now -TAKE ACTION!

WMUbuildsbrains

A surprising 75 percent of Young Americans under age 45 STILL do not know the signs and symptoms of stroke!


Young Bright Minds at Risk


KnowStrokeTshirtFront copy

post by David Dansereau-Know-Stroke.org

To make matter worse, many of the participants in a recent survey on stroke warning signs admit they would likely wait out the symptoms — weakness, numbness, difficulty seeing or difficulty seeing — of a potentially deadly brain episode to see if things got better on their own.  This “wait and see” approach could be a tragic mistake, because stroke can often be successfully treated if it is caught early.

The first three hours after a person starts to experience stroke symptoms are often referred to as the “golden window,” when doctors can often minimize or reverse damage by restoring blood flow to the brain. Without treatment most will end up dying or with permanent disability.

stroke911knowstrokeorgThe stroke survey was commissioned by the Ronald Reagan- University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center.  That national survey included responses from 1,009 people, 466 of whom were under 45. Without understanding the danger of the symptoms, the vast majority of those younger people surveyed, 74 percent, say that they wouldn’t seek immediate help.

Dr. David Liebeskind, a professor of neurology and director of the neurovascular imaging research core at UCLA is not surprised by the statistics. “They are in line with what we’ve been seeing,” Liebeskind says. Many younger people dismiss telling symptoms because they think that stokes only occur in the elderly. While they may be more common as people age, “we see them at any age from birth till 105,” Liebeskind says.

Making matter worse, studies have suggested that strokes among people under 45 have increased by as much as 53 percent since the 1990s.

A surprising 75 percent of Americans under age 45 do not know the signs and symptoms of stroke. Even more disturbing, many say they would likely wait out the symptoms — weakness, numbness, difficulty seeing or difficulty seeing — of a potentially deadly brain episode.  Denial is partly why young people don’t seek immediate treatment. Strokes often don’t “Hurt” like a broken arm or heart attack where people need to get help right away.  Symptoms of stroke can be misinterpreted as a headache from stress, a hangover from too much drinking or lack of sleep- therefore sometimes young stroke victims make the mistake of just trying to sleep it off.

And that could be a tragic mistake, because stroke can often be successfully treated if it is caught early.

The first three hours after a person starts to experience stroke symptoms are often referred to as the “golden window,” when doctors can often minimize or reverse damage by restoring blood flow to the brain. Without treatment most will end up dying or with permanent disability.

What you should do:

Know the Stroke Warning Signs. Act in time. Call 911

Here are some STROKE warning signs to look for:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion or trouble speaking or understanding speech.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

High Blood Pressure and Obesity are Known Risk Factors for Stroke->Learn what you can do to lower your risk!

thickpaperbackfronttrans200x319

References:

MedlinePlus

Today

 

 

Sharing Some Good Advice for Families of Young Stroke Survivors


Check out Brian’s Advice, Good Stuff!

(I especially like his advice on attitude and what to make of a stroke “prognosis”)

Learn more about Brain and Subscribe to his Channel on Youtube

10 Year Old Girl Uses Knowledge of Stroke to Save her Grandpa’s Life


Source: Steve Harris / News 4 St. Louis,Mo. (KMOV.com)

Kids are Never too Young to Know-Stroke and SAVE Lives!

Follow the link and watch this great video to learn how the young bright mind of 4th grader Sophia Tabors recognized the stroke warning signs and took FAST action to save her grandpa.  As Steve Harris from News 4 reports in this video, Sophia learned what to do from her 4th grade science fair project on Strokes.

Great Job Sophia!

SophiaTabors_kmov
Source: KMOV.org -Harris Hero: “Fourth grader used science fair project to save grandpa’s life”

[Personal Sidebar: Sophia’s story is another great example of why we need stroke education in schools early! -see my Bright Minds Campaign for more info] Source: http://www.kmov.com/story/29623746/fourth-grader-used-science-fair-project-to-save-grandpas-life http://www.know-stroke.org/brightminds/ KnowStrokeTshirtFront copy